Students in the International Cinema class: ICS 290R.

The minor in International Cinema Studies is for students who love visual media and want to develop skills in critical analysis, writing, and interpretation along with knowledge about cinema theory, history, and diverse cultures. The ICS minor is a great addition to a major in the Humanities for a media-oriented student as it allows for a deeper focus on cinema, media studies, and international contexts than most majors are able to support. It is also a great addition for majors from outside the college of Humanities who need their cinema fix and something to help them round out their education with course work that will make them better communicators, writers, and thinkers.

The complete up-to-date list of requirement for the ICS minor can be found in the university catalog. For additional questions including information about how to sign up for the minor, contact program coordinator, Prof. Doug Weatherford (douglas_weatherford@byu.edu).

UPCOMING CLASSES IN INTERNATIONAL CINEMA STUDIES INCLUDE:

SUMMER 2020

SPAN 356R: Filmic Connections US-Mexico (Prof. Doug Weatherford; taught in Spanish)

FALL 2020

ICS 290R: International Cinema (1.5 credits, Prof. Marc Yamada). Students view films showing at the IC and discuss them in a seminar setting.

ICS 491: International Cinema Studies Capstone Course (1 credit, Prof. Doug Weatherford, contact instructor for add code). Final course taken by ICS minors.

CL CV 261: Greek and Latin Literature in Film (3 credits, Prof. Roger Macfarlane). Literature and civilization of ancient Greece and Rome as depicted in modern film with attendant problems of accuracy and historicity. Taught in English.

CHIN 495/ICS 490R: Disability in Chinese Literature, Cinema, and Culture (3 credits, Prof. Steve Riep). Taught in English.

FREN/ITAL 317: French and Italian Cinema (3 credits, Prof. Bob Hudson). Background for understanding and appreciating the best of motion picture art in France and Italy. Taught in English.

GERM/SCAND 217: German and Scandinavian Cinema (3 credits, Prof. Julie Allen and Prof. Rob McFarland). Background for understanding and appreciating basic visual literacy skills and the best of motion picture art in Scandinavia and German-speaking Europe. Taught in English.

IHUM 490R/ICS 490R: American Horror (3 credits, Prof. Carl Sederholm). Examination of key contributions to American horror narratives in film and literature from the 1950s to the present. Major themes include the different forms monsters take, why horror narratives are so popular, and why people enjoy being scared.

ITAL 449R/ICS 490R: Viewing Italy in 2020 (3 credits, Prof. Dan Paul). An exploration of the cultural history of Italy through film and other visual media, interrogating what it means to “be Italian” in 2020 through topics such as masculinity, gender, and race. Taught in Italian.

SPAN 457R/ICS 490R: Film Connections between Mexico and the United States (3 credits, Prof. Doug Weatherford). An examination of Mexican and US filmmakers who cross the border to make movies. Taught in Spanish.

WINTER 2021

ICS 290R: International Cinema (1.5 credits; Prof. Doug Weatherford). Students view films showing at the IC and discuss them in a seminar setting.

ICS 390: Film Theory (3 credits, Prof. Kerry Soper).

ICS 491: International Cinema Studies Capstone Course (1 credit, Prof. Marc Yamada, contact instructor for add code). Final course taken by ICS minors.

FREN/ITAL 317: French and Italian Cinema (3 credits, Prof. Daryl Lee). Background for understanding and appreciating the best of motion picture art in France and Italy. Taught in English.

GERM 440R: Weimar Cinema (3 credits, Prof. Rob McFarland).

ICS 490R: Comedy and Satire (3 credits, Prof. Kerry Soper).

ITAL 449: Representations of Masculinities and Gender (3 credits, Prof. Dan Paul). Taught in Italian.

RUSS 343: Russian Cinema (Prof. Raissa Solovyeva). Taught in Russian.

SPAN 451R: Ecological Thought (3 credits, Prof. Mac Wilson) Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 438: Hispanic Cinema (3 credits, Prof. Doug Weatherford). Introduction to the study of Hispanic film. Prior experience with film studies is useful, but not required. Taught in Spanish.

See the university class schedule for more details.